9/21/16

How To Make Kale Powder

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"I believe that the greatest gift you can give your family and the world is a healthy you."
Joyce Meyer


I have a serious love for kale. It manages to make its way into our meals on a weekly basis and I always incorporate it into breakfast, lunch and dinner. Whether it's in the form of a smoothie, kale chips, roasted kale, sautéed kale or a kale frittata, my family can guarantee kale is on the menu.

My friend recently gave me a jar of her homemade kale powder and I can't get enough of it! I've been adding it to our morning smoothies, sprinkling it over salads and casseroles, tossing it into eggs, and well, just about anything and everything. For the most part, this powder is tasteless and can easily be added to any dish to give you a healthy boost of vitamin K, vitamin A and vitamin C. Kale is also a good source of vitamin B6, folate,thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, vitamin E and several dietary minerals, including iron, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. In other words, it's superfood that you should incorporate into your diet!

KALE POWDER
yield: depends on how much kale you use

INGREDIENTS:
1-2 bunches of fresh kale (it can be Curly, Lacinato, or Red Russian)

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Thoroughly wash the kale and press between two clean towels to dry.
2. Remove any thick stems.
3. Lay out the kale on large cookie sheets if using an oven or line them on the tray of your dehydrator.
4. Dehydrate at around 120 degrees until crisp. I use the oven but you can just as easily use a dehydrating machine.
5. Once kale is dehydrated, place the leaves in a Vitamix or Ninja (you can use a blender or food processor as well) and pulse until desired texture. Try to get it to a powder consistency; this could take a few minutes.
6. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dry place.

Fun fact:
Until the end of the Middle Ages, kale was one of the most common green vegetables in Europe. During World War II, the cultivation of kale in the U.K. was encouraged by the Dig for Victory campaign. The vegetable was easy to grow and provided important nutrients to supplement those missing from a normal diet because of rationing.
*source: Wikipedia.com

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